Knowledge of Protection Mainstreaming

Output indicator

Indicator Phrasing

% of training participants who demonstrate adequate knowledge and understanding of protection mainstreaming
% de participants de la formation qui font preuve d’une connaissance et compréhension adéquates de l’intégration de la protection
% de participantes na formação que demonstram conhecimentos e compreensão adequados da integração da protecção
% účastníků školení prokazujících adekvátní znalost a porozumění protection mainstreamingu

Indicator Phrasing

English: % of training participants who demonstrate adequate knowledge and understanding of protection mainstreaming

French: % de participants de la formation qui font preuve d’une connaissance et compréhension adéquates de l’intégration de la protection

Portuguese: % de participantes na formação que demonstram conhecimentos e compreensão adequados da integração da protecção

Czech: % účastníků školení prokazujících adekvátní znalost a porozumění protection mainstreamingu

What is its purpose?

The indicator measures the proportion of people (e.g. aid workers, government officials, etc.) who were trained on protection mainstreaming and increased their knowledge and understanding of this topic to a minimum acceptable level.

How to Collect and Analyse the Required Data

Determine the indicator's value by using the following methodology:

 

1) Define a limited number of the most important knowledge that the training participants should gain as a result of completing the training. To avoid having unrealistically high or unnecessarily low requirements, verify the test’s difficulty by pre-testing it with at least 6 people.

Be aware that different groups of people might need different knowledge about protection mainstreaming – for example, providers of services in a refugee camp might have different learning needs from government officials.

 

2) Prepare simple tests (one pre-test, one post-test) assessing whether the training participants have the pre-defined, most important knowledge and understanding. Ensure that both tests focus on similar topics and have a similar level of difficulty (so that they are comparable). The tests can use a combination of:

   - questions assessing people’s knowledge about essential protection mainstreaming standards, procedures, measures, etc.

   - scenarios where the person is asked to describe how s/he would respond to a given situation (i.e. there are no predefined answers)

   - questions asking people to choose between two or more statements (one being correct, one or more wrong)

   - questions assessing the extent to which people believe common misconceptions related to mainstreaming protection

 

3) Decide how many scores will be allocated to each correct answer. For example, for a correct answer to an easier question you can give one score while for correct answers to more difficult questions / scenarios you can give two scores.

 

4) Decide how many scores a person needs to achieve to be considered as having “an acceptable knowledge and understanding of protection mainstreaming” (e.g. at least 10 out of 15 scores).

 

5) At the start of the training, administer the pre-tests to the training participants. Count the number of participants who in this test achieved the minimum acceptable score (see point 4).  

 

6) At the end of the training, administer the post-tests to the training participants. Count the total score of each participant. Count the number of participants who in this test achieved the minimum acceptable score (see point 4).

 

7) To calculate the indicator’s value, divide the number of training participants who during the post-test gained the minimum acceptable score by the total number of participants who completed the test. Multiply the result by 100.

Important Comments

1) Always conduct both a “pre-test” and “post-test” – otherwise you will not know the extent to which the respondents changed their knowledge and skills as a result of the training.

 

2) If you are interested in whether people retained the knowledge, conduct the post-test twice – once immediately after the training is completed (showing you the immediate learning) and then 1-2 months later (showing you the knowledge which people actually remember and might use).

 

3) The tests do not need to relate to a single training only – they can be provided, for example:

  - before and after a series of several trainings / workshops / practices

  - during the baseline and endline surveys, assessing the overall change in people’s knowledge and understanding of protection mainstreaming

 

This guidance was prepared by People in Need ©

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